Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland

'Veganism can cause anorexia': Italian priest

Share this article

'Veganism can cause anorexia': Italian priest
The vegan diet is based solely on plant-based products. Photo: Richard/Flickr
10:31 CET+01:00
A row has erupted in north-eastern Italy after a priest reportedly refused to host a vegan book launch, claiming that the meat- and dairy-free diet can prompt eating disorders.

The local vegan association in Castelfranco Veneto, Vegani Castellani, approached the town’s priest to request a venue to host their book launch.

But earlier this week Adriano Cevolotto refused the request, arguing that veganism can bring on anorexia, Vegani Castellani said in an online statement.

The priest reportedly claimed that a diet based only on plant products, without Italy’s traditional plates of meat and cheese, could lead to “serious problems”.

Evidence however shows that veganism can be a healthy diet, while the World Health Organization (WHO) recently expressed alarm as the unsustainable consumption of animal products globally.

Responding to the priest’s claims, the vegan association said his belief was “a sad prejudice” and “ridiculous”.

“To us at Vegani Castellani it feels more than absurd that such a criticism comes from the representative of a church,” the group said online.

But elsewhere in Italy, veganism has been welcomed. Last year Rome hosted Universo Vegano’s world record attempt for the world’s largest vegan sandwich.

The four-metre long meal was filled with chickpeas, wheat gluten, soy strips and lupini beans and offered to passersby in the city centre.

READ MORE: Italians set vegan panino 'record'

Don't miss a story about Italy - Join us on Facebook and Twitter

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

Change the world with a master's degree from Sweden's Linköping University

Master's students at world-leading Linköping University (LiU) aren't there simply to study. They solve real-world problems alongside experts in fields that can create a better tomorrow. Do you have what it takes to join them?

Advertisement