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Pope decries marginalisation of handicapped people

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Pope decries marginalisation of handicapped people
The pope also issued an appeal to remove the causes of modern slavery. Photo: AFP
15:42 CEST+02:00
Pope Francis, addressing an audience of 20,000 sick and handicapped people at the Vatican on Sunday, decried the marginalisation of those with disabilities, pointing to the way body image has become big business and "anything imperfect has to be hidden away".

Speaking on the last day of the Vatican's weekend jubilee for the sick and disabled, he said: "The world does not become better because only apparently 'perfect' people live there, but when human solidarity, mutual acceptance and respect increase."

The pope told those gathered for the special mass in Saint Peter's Square that in "an age when care for one's body has become an obsession and a big business, anything imperfect has to be hidden away, since it threatens the happiness and serenity of the privileged few and endangers the dominant model."

The crowd of sick and handicapped faithful had come to Rome for the jubilee which ran from Friday to Sunday.

The pope also issued an appeal to remove the causes of modern slavery.

Speaking after the recitation of the Angelus prayer in St. Peter's Square, the Pope highlighted some of the priorities of today's world and referred specifically to Sunday's World Day Against Child Labour.
 
"All together let us join in renewing the effort to remove the causes of this modern slavery that deprives millions of children of some fundamental rights and exposes them to serious danger. There are many child slaves in the world today.”

 
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