SHARE
COPY LINK

BUSINESS

Renault shares plunge as Fiat merger talks fail

Renault shares plunged on Thursday after Italian-American carmaker Fiat Chrysler said it had withdrawn a proposal for a merger, saying it would be unable to reach an agreement with the French government.

Renault shares plunge as Fiat merger talks fail
A merger between Fiat Chrysler and Renault would have created the world's biggest carmaker. Photo: Marco Bertorello/AFP

Fiat Chrysler (FCA) “remains firmly convinced” of the interest of its offer but “political conditions do not currently exist in France to carry out such an arrangement”, it said in a statement.

French automaker Renault announced earlier that its board of directors had not reached a decision following a crunch meeting held at the request of the French state, the biggest shareholder in Renault with a 15 percent stake.

Fiat Chrysler proposed a “merger of equals” with Renault last week which was welcomed by financial markets and had been given a conditional green light by the French government, although it warned against “any haste” regarding the proposed 50/50 merger.

READ ALSO: Fiat Chrysler proposes merger with Renault


Photo: Loic Venance, Marco Bertorllo/AFP

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire had said a merger, which would have brought together the flagship brands as well as Alfa Romeo, Jeep, Maserati, Dacia and Lada, would be “a real opportunity for the French auto industry”. However, he had set various conditions, including that no plants be closed as part of the tie-up and that the Renault-Nissan alliance continues. 

A source close to Renault said Le Maire had asked for a board meeting next Tuesday after he returns from a trip to Japan where he will discuss the proposal with his Japanese counterpart.

At Wednesday evening's board of directors vote at Renault's headquarters near Paris, all the directors were for the merger, apart from a representative of employees affiliated with the powerful CGT union and two representatives of Nissan — a long-time Renault partner — who abstained, the source added.

The two directors appointed by Nissan, however, asked “to write in the minutes that they would say yes with a little more time”.

Fiat Chrysler said: “FCA remains firmly convinced of the compelling, transformational rationale of a proposal that has been widely appreciated since it was submitted, the structure and terms of which were carefully balanced to deliver substantial benefits to all parties.

“However, it has become clear that the political conditions in France do not currently exist for such a combination to proceed successfully.”

Renault holds a 43-percent stake in Nissan, whose stocks tumbled 2.64 percent to 742.7 yen on Thursday after the withdrawal was announced. Relations in the partnership have been under strain since the arrest last November of former boss Carlos Ghosn, who is awaiting trial in Japan over charges of under-reporting his salary for years while at Nissan and using company funds for personal expenses.

The merger would have created a group worth more than €30 billion, producing 8.7 million vehicles per year. The combined mega-group — including Nissan and Mitsubishi — would be by far the world's biggest, selling some 15 million vehicles, surpassing Volkswagen and Toyota, which sell around 10.6 million each.

Foreign takeovers of major French firms are highly controversial and successive governments have sought to defend domestic industrial groups which are seen as important for their technology or jobs. 

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

BUSINESS

EU finds Italy’s Alitalia loans ‘illegal’ but airline free to keep money

The EU's antitrust authorities ruled Friday that Italy's 900 million euro loans to long-struggling airline Alitalia were "illegal", but cleared the country's new carrier to get state funding and avoid paying back the money. 

Ahmad AL-RUBAYE / AFP
Ahmad AL-RUBAYE / AFP

“Following our in-depth investigation, we reached the conclusion that two public loans worth EUR 900 million granted by Italy to Alitalia gave the company an unfair advantage over its competitors, in breach of EU State aid rules,” said EU competition chief Margrethe Vestager said in a statement.

“They must now be recovered by Italy from Alitalia to help restore a level playing field in the European aviation industry.”

But the authorities in Brussels simultaneously said new flag airline ITA – set to start flying next month – was not liable to reimburse the money and that 1.35 billion euros being injected into the firm by Rome did not breach state aid rules.

“Italy has demonstrated that there is a clear break between Alitalia and the new airline ITA, and that its investment in ITA is in line with terms that a private investor would have accepted,” Vestager said.

“Once ITA takes off, it is for Italy and ITA’s management to make use of this opportunity once and for all. And we will continue to do our part to ensure fair competition in the European aviation sector.”

READ ALSO:

Loss-making Alitalia was placed under state administration in 2017 but Italy has struggled to find an investor to take it over. The situation was only exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic that grounded airlines worldwide.

The Italian government gave the company two loans for the amount of EUR 600 million and EUR 300 million in 2017, as Alitalia scrambled for liquidity without access to the debt market.

Earlier this year Italy said it had reached an agreement with the European Union for a bailout that creates a new debt-free company to take over some of Alitalia’s assets – ITA.

The board of directors of ITA last month approved a binding offer for 52 of Alitalia’s aircraft, related airport slots and other assets.

The Italian government has created a 100-million-euro ($117-million) fund to reimburse Alitalia customers.

Italy provided state loans to Alitalia totalling 1.3 billion euros between 2017 and 2019.

In July, it approved another 700 million euros for ITA.

Further sums are expected in 2022 and 2023, bringing the total to 1.35 billion euros.

SHOW COMMENTS