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HEALTH

MAP – Which parts of Italy have been hardest-hit by coronavirus?

LATEST: Italy's death toll from coronavirus continues to rise and has now surpassed China's with over 3,400 dead and the number of confirmed cases above 40,000. Here's the latest map to show how the regions have been hit.

MAP - Which parts of Italy have been hardest-hit by coronavirus?
A picture taken on March 8, 2020 shows an empty road leading to Linate Airport in Milan, after millions of people were placed under forced quarantine in northern Italy. Background photo: Miguel Media/

The Local regularly updates this map with the latest figures for the number of coronavirus cases across Italy.

Which regions of Italy are affected by the coronavirus?

The map below highlights the regions of Italy most impacted by the coronavirus spread.

The northern region of Lombardy (dark red) continues to see by far the most cases as well as the most deaths from the virus, where hospitals are struggling to cope.

The northern regions of Emilia-Romagna and Veneto are, after Lombardy the most hard hit of the Italian regions.

The south of the country has seen fewer cases but the only region still without deaths, as of the 20th, is  Basilicata. The heel of Italy, Puglia, have recorded 25 deaths so far.

All the current information about the virus is available here

According to the WHO more than 80 percent of patients infected with the virus have mild disease and recover, while 14 percent have severe diseases such as pneumonia. Around five percent of cases are considered critical.

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The chart below is the latest released from Italian authorities that shows the regional breakdown. The boxes coloured yellow is a breakdown of the conditions of all the confirmed cases of coronavirus in each region.

Ricoverati con sintomi – Recovering with symptoms

Terapia Intensiva – In intensive care

Isolamento domiciliare – In isolation at home

The column coloured green is the number who have recovered (dimessi guariti), the red column is for the number of deaths (deceduti) and orange is for the total number of cases since the outbreak began, including, current cases, deaths and recovered.

The grey column on the far right, titled tamponi is for the number of tests carried out.

 

And what's the situation in Europe?

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Member comments

  1. The Local kept track of cases and deaths in a section titled “In Numbers: Italian Regions affected by Coronavirus” from early March until Mar 20. This was very important and helpful info to us subscribers. Why not continue this information each day so we have as much info as possible to better follow this pandemic?

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TRAVEL NEWS

Covid face mask rule on flights in Europe set to be eased

The mandatory EU-wide mask requirement for air travel is set to be dropped from Monday, May 16th, but airlines may still require passengers to wear masks on some or all flights

Covid face mask rule on flights in Europe set to be eased

Europe-wide facemask rules on flights are set to be ditched as early as next week in light of new recommendations from health and air safety experts.

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) dropped recommendations for mandatory mask-wearing in airports and during flights in updated Covid-19 safety measures for travel issued on Wednesday, May 11th.

The new rules are expected to be rolled out from Monday, May 16th, but airlines may still continue to require the wearing of masks on some or all of flights. And the updated health safety measures still say that wearing a face mask remains one of the best ways to protect against the transmission of the virus.

The joint EASA/ECDC statement reminded travellers that masks may still be required on flights to destinations in certain countries that still require the wearing of masks on public transport and in transport hubs.

It also recommends that vulnerable passengers should continue to wear a face mask regardless of the rules, ideally an FFP2/N95/KN95 type mask which offers a higher level of protection than a standard surgical mask.

“From next week, face masks will no longer need to be mandatory in air travel in all cases, broadly aligning with the changing requirements of national authorities across Europe for public transport,” EASA executive director Patrick Ky said in the statement. 

“For passengers and air crews, this is a big step forward in the normalisation of air travel. Passengers should however behave responsibly and respect the choices of others around them. And a passenger who is coughing and sneezing should strongly consider wearing a face mask, for the reassurance of those seated nearby.”  

ECDC director Andrea Ammon added: “The development and continuous updates to the Aviation Health Safety Protocol in light of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic have given travellers and aviation personnel better knowledge of the risks of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and its variants. 

“While risks do remain, we have seen that non-pharmaceutical interventions and vaccines have allowed our lives to begin to return to normal. 

“While mandatory mask-wearing in all situations is no longer recommended, it is important to be mindful that together with physical distancing and good hand hygiene it is one of the best methods of reducing transmission. 

“The rules and requirements of departure and destination states should be respected and applied consistently, and travel operators should take care to inform passengers of any required measures in a timely manner.”

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