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‘Ending in the worst way’: Italian ex-PM Berlusconi condemns Trump over US Capitol attack

Former Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi said on Friday that Donald Trump's time at the White House had ended in "the worst way".

'Ending in the worst way': Italian ex-PM Berlusconi condemns Trump over US Capitol attack
Silvio Berlusconi's political tactics are often seen as a model for Trump's. Photo: Tiziana Fabi/AFP

Berlusconi said “it would be unjust and uncharitable” to deny Trump's “achievements” as US President.

However, Monday's mob attack by his supporters on the US Capitol “overshadows those achievements and will darken the historical memory of this
presidency,” Berlusconi wrote in a letter to Il Giornale, a newspaper owned by Berlusconi's family company.

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“Trump's mandate is ending in the worst way,” said Berlusconi, appearing to distance his own politics from Trump's by adding: “a right that attacks the Capitol will never be our right.”
 
“This tragic episode, the American right, which reflects a widespread mood in American society, encouraged by irresponsible propaganda, is certainly not the Republican right that we have always appreciated,” Berlusconi said.
 
The violence at the Capitol, the seat of the US parliament, on Wednesday left a police officer and four others dead.
 
Flags at the US Capitol building fly at half-mast on Friday. Photo: Brendan Smialowski / AFP
 
Berlusconi, 84, is a former real estate and media mogul who reinvented himself as a conservative politician, served three times as prime minister and continues to lead the centre-right Forza Italia party.

He remains a popular public figure in Italy despite being best known in Italy and abroad for sex scandals and a tax fraud conviction.

His political tactics are often seen as a trailblazing model for Trump's.

In November, Berlusconi commented that Trump's “very often too arrogant attitude” had been to blame for his election defeat.

The attack in Washington has also been condemned by Berlusconi's ally Matteo Salvini of the hard-right League party, long an outspoken backer of Trump.

“Violence is never a solution, never. Long live freedom and democracy, always and everywhere,” Salvini tweeted.

Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte voiced concern about the attack on Wednesday, writing on Twitter that: “Violence is incompatible with the exercise of democratic rights and freedoms.”

 

However, Conte and other members of the current Italian government did not join some other European political leaders including German Chancellor Angela Merkel in directly criticising Trump and his supporters over the Capitol attack.

READ ALSO: 'We can't wait to work side by side': Italian PM sends congratulations to Joe Biden

“This tragic episode, the American right, which reflects a widespread mood in American society, encouraged by irresponsible propaganda, is certainly not the Republican right that we have always appreciated,” Berlusconi said.

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POLITICS

Italy plans to stop ‘revolving door’ between judges and politicians

Italian lawmakers on Tuesday advanced a planned reform aimed at stopping the 'revolving door' between justice and government, as part of wider changes to the country's creaking judicial system.

Italy plans to stop 'revolving door' between judges and politicians

The proposed reform, which still has to be approved by the Italian Senate in the coming weeks, imposes significant limitations on the number of magistrates, prosecutors and judges looking to go into politics – a frequent move in Italy.

Under the submitted changes, a magistrate wishing to stand for election, whether national, regional or local, will not be able to do so in the region where they have worked over the previous three years.

At the end of their mandate, magistrates who have held elective positions will not be able to return to the judiciary – they will be moved to non-jurisdictional posts at, for example, the Court of Auditors or the Supreme Court of Cassation, according to local media reports.

Furthermore, magistrates who have applied for elective positions but have not been successful for at least three years will no longer be able to work in the region where they ran for office. 

The reform is part of a wider programme of changes to Italy’s tortuous judicial system. This is required by the European Commission to unlock billions of euros in the form of post-pandemic recovery funds.

Public perception of the independence of Italian courts and judges is among the worst in Europe, according to the EU’s justice scoreboard.

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