SHARE
COPY LINK

HEALTH

Florence wants to ban smoking in parks and at bus stops

Local authorities in Florence are preparing to restrict smoking outdoors as well as inside.

Florence wants to ban smoking in parks and at bus stops
Florence is set to follow Milan in banning smoking outdoors in public. Photo: Marco Bertorello/AFP

The city council plans to introduce a ban on smoking “in public parks, gardens and in other places that are usually crowded and where youngsters gather”, local councillor for the environment Cecilia Del Re told La Repubblica.

The measure will be included in Florence's upcoming plan to reduce air pollution, Del Re told the newspaper, which is due to be approved by the end of February. Allowing time to define and communicate the new rules, the ban is expected to come into force around June 2021.

That will make Florence the second big city in Italy after Milan to widely restrict smoking outdoors in the city centre. Milan's ban, approved late last year and effective from this month, forbids lighting up in places such as public transport stops, parks, childrens' play areas, sports stadiums and cemeteries.

Other Italian cities including Verona and Bolzano already outlaw smoking in public parks – though not on the streets – while Venice has proposed making parts of its historic centre no-smoking zones (without passing any legislation to date).

READ ALSO: 

Health and environmental advocates have long pushed for restrictions on smoking outdoors, notably on Italy's beaches, saying the habit contributes to air pollution and litter.

The campaign has taken on new urgency amid the Covid-19 pandemic, which added a new health risk to the act of smoking at a time when Italy requires people to wear face masks in public at all times, including outside. Studies have also suggested a possible link between poor air quality and severe illness from Covid-19.

Consumer watchdog Codacons has urged Italian authorities to follow Spain's example and forbid smoking in public outdoor places throughout the country. The Spanish government in August banned smoking on the street, as recommended by the World Health Organisation, as coronavirus cases surged.

Italy has had a ban on smoking indoors since 2005, but rules are less strict than in some other European countries; smoking is allowed on bar and restaurant terraces and next to the doors of public buildings, for example.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

HEALTH

Covid-19: Average life expectancy in Italy dropped by 1.2 years in 2020

Coronavirus cut average life expectancy in Italy by 1.2 years in 2020, and by more than four years in parts of the country hit hardest by the pandemic, official statistics showed on Monday.

Covid-19: Average life expectancy in Italy dropped by 1.2 years in 2020
A cemetery in Bergamo, one of the parts of Italy which has suffered the highest death toll during the coronavirus crisis. Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP

Life expectancy at birth last year stood at 82 years, compared to 83.2 years in 2019, the Istat national statistics office said in a new release.

“In 2020, the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic and the resulting sharp increase in mortality abruptly interrupted the growth in life expectancy at birth that had characterised the trend until 2019,” it said in a statement.

For many years Italy has boasted one of the longest life expectancies in Europe. But with the spread of the coronavirus, its ageing population was especially vulnerable to falling sick.

Italy has recorded close to 130,000 deaths from Covid-19 in total, which have mainly been among the elderly.

READ ALSO: 

The drop in life expectancy was even steeper in some regions such as the northern provinces of Bergamo and Cremona, the epicentre of the Covid-19 outbreak in early 2020.

Men lost on average 4.3 and 4.5 years while women lost 3.2 years and 2.9 years in these areas.

More than 129,500 people with coronavirus have died in Italy, the majority in the northern regions where 36 percent of the population lives.

According to Istat, the pandemic has wiped out many of the gains made year-on-year since 2010, when Italy’s average life expectancy was 81.7.

Italy was the first European country to face a major outbreak of Covid-19 and for a time the region of Lombardy, the nation’s economic heart, became the epicentre of the global pandemic.

Quality of life has also been impacted in Italy, particulary due to the economic repercussions of the crisis.

The government has since rolled out a vaccination programme that, as of Monday evening, had almost 72 percent of the population over 12 fully immunised.

Italy has set a target of vaccinating at least 80 percent of the population by the end of September.

SHOW COMMENTS