SHARE
COPY LINK
PRESENTED BY AXA

Cost of living crisis: What is driving it and how does it impact internationals?

You can’t have missed it -- almost everything we use and consume is suddenly costing a lot more than it used to. It’s also having a marked impact on internationals abroad.

Cost of living crisis: What is driving it and how does it impact internationals?
Worried about rising costs? It's not just you -- prices are soaring across the globe. We find out why. Photo: Getty Images

Almost everyone has felt the effects of sudden cost of living increases, and for many it has had real consequences on where and how they live and work.

With soaring energy bills and increases in both food and petrol, consumer inflation in Europe hit eight percent in May and could reach nine percent by the end of the summer. Those who moved abroad to work or study have felt the effects particularly keenly.

Together with the international health insurance provider, AXA – Global Healthcare, we investigate why costs have soared so quickly, and exactly how this impacts those who have made another country their home. 

What is driving the increase in living costs? 

While there’s no singular reason that living costs are increasing across the globe, there are several factors that we can point to as contributing to the problem. 

First and foremost, the coronavirus pandemic had a devastating effect on manufacturing industries and supply chains around the world. Worker illness, government shutdowns and disruptions to the supply of essential resources dealt a significant blow to global GDP in 2020, resulting in a fall of more than three percent. 

Restarting manufacturing and global logistics after months of effective shutdown subsequently led to a substantial rise in the costs of goods, as supply struggled to keep up with surging demand. Even with massive investment in logistics infrastructure, to date there are still lengthy delays supplying goods such as machine parts and electronics, leading to surging business costs.

Climate change has also played a role in the crisis. The increasing unpredictability of weather patterns over the past two years has meant that many regions around the world were impacted by severe weather events, including several in Europe. An increased incidence of heat waves and cold snaps have also placed a strain on gas reserves, leading to escalating power bills. 

Of course, the war in Ukraine is having a serious impact on the cost of living, most noticeably in Europe. The World Bank has suggested it could be responsible for the biggest price shock in 50 years. As a major agricultural nation, wheat prices have begun to sharply increase following the invasion, as has the price of natural gas – Ukraine holds Europe’s second-largest reserve of the resource.

Another consequence of the Ukraine war is spiraling fuel prices. As Russia is one of the world’s top three oil exporters, its current frosty relationship with the West means that the cost of oil per barrel will remain elevated. Coupled with logistical delays in delivering gas and fuel, as an ongoing consequence of the pandemic, consumers and businesses are experiencing substantially increased transport costs. 

One way to offset cost of living increases is by ensuring you are safe from unforeseen medical costs. AXA has a range of policies designed specifically for internationals

Boiling point: Climate change is one factor increasing the cost of living. Photo: Getty Images

How do rising costs impact internationals? 

The cost of living crisis is having a significant effect on the mental health of internationals. Research by AXA – Global Healthcare, in the form of its Mind Health Index 2022 supports this idea. 

Its research, conducted prior to the current crisis, indicated that 28 percent of non-native (international) participants rated their stress level between eight and 10 (out of 10), while 35 percent of non-natives said that financial stability was an issue causing stress. Thirty-nine percent of non-native participants believed that they faced an uncertain future when it comes to work and finances – a massive stressor, regardless of where you may be. 

The causes of this are also clearly identifiable. Primarily, many internationals simply do not have the assets to sustain repeated price shocks in terms of food or energy costs. A survey conducted by market research firm, Finaccord, found that approximately three-quarters of internationals worldwide are individual workers – ie. depending on a single income.

A further third are also students, meaning that they are paying tuition costs while trying to support themselves, whether with a local job or payments from home. Quite simply, many internationals cannot afford to pay much more for necessities, particularly at a time when wages have stagnated. 

Many internationals also lack the kind of support networks that would let them otherwise overcome economic turmoil. Earlier research by AXA revealed that 87 percent of participating internationals felt isolated and cut off from family and friends, who would otherwise be able to assist and share costs.

As a consequence, further research conducted in 2019 by AXA – Global Healthcare revealed that one in five participating internationals would return home should prices continue to rise – even though over 50 percent reported that they enjoyed a better salary and quality of life than they did at home.

The research also discovered that housing and tuition costs comprised the hardest financial pressures for internationals – with 51 percent identifying rent and housing costs, and 40 percent identifying education as more costly than expected. 

It could be stated, therefore, that prior to the global spike in the cost of living, internationals already found themselves in a tight spot, with the threat of having to return home looming over them. Now, with skyrocketing prices, excessive and prolonged stress is an even greater contributor to a range of illnesses. 

Internationals are more prone to sudden increases in costs of living. To ensure some certainty, explore health insurance options from the experts on living abroad, AXA

Securing an international future

Moving abroad to start a new life is a costly endeavour and one that many work for years to achieve. It’s worth it, however: the experience of working or studying abroad is suggested to have a number of economic and lifestyle benefits.

That said, navigating the financial stresses of rising costs can be challenging. 

Many internationals opt to offset the challenges of rising costs with comprehensive health insurance coverage. AXA – Global Healthcare’s research shows that a quarter of internationals worry about the cost of healthcare in their new home, and would even travel abroad to seek treatment. 

Depending on where you are, unforeseen medical costs can run into the tens of thousands, meaning the difference between getting by, and having to return to your home country.

If you’re seeking a health insurance provider that offers comprehensive coverage and a range of useful benefits, you may want to consider AXA – Global Healthcare. Operating globally, the company has over 55 years of experience in covering those living and working abroad¹.

AXA – Global Healthcare policyholders get 24-7 care from personal advisors, connecting them with excellent private healthcare from a worldwide network of doctors, surgeons and specialists.

Outside of emergency care, AXA – Global Healthcare provides a number of additional benefits. Policyholders are able to access a number of annual check ups. Special care is available to those diagnosed with cancer, and mental health issues aren’t ignored – the AXA – Global Healthcare Mind Health Service¹ means that you have professionals for support wherever you may be. 

As an international, dealing with the rising costs of living can be difficult. However, you can ensure that should something happen to you, you can avoid unexpected financial burdens.

Furthermore, with AXA – Global Healthcare’s range of additional services, you can make sure health problems are identified before they become a problem, allowing you to focus on living, working and enjoying life abroad. 

Looking to protect your life abroad? Get in touch with AXA – Global Healthcare so you can enjoy life with the knowledge that you’re fully covered

¹AXA has been providing International Private Medical Insurance for over 55 years

²The Mind Health Service is provided by Teladoc Health,

AXA Global Healthcare (EU) Limited. Registered in Ireland number 630468. Registered Office: Wolfe Tone House, Wolfe Tone Street, Dublin 1. AXA Global Healthcare (EU) Limited is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland.

AXA Global Healthcare (UK) Limited. Registered in England (No. 03039521). Registered Office: 20 Gracechurch Street, London, EC3V 0BG, United Kingdom. AXA Global Healthcare (UK) Limited is authorised and regulated in the UK by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

MILAN

Expat life cheaper in Stockholm than Rome

The cost of living for expats is cheaper in Stockholm than in Rome or Milan, according to a global ranking released on Thursday.

Expat life cheaper in Stockholm than Rome
The Swedish capital, Stockholm, is cheaper for expatriates than Milan and Rome. Stockholm photo: Shutterstock

Milan is the 30th most expensive of 211 cities for expats, just one place above Rome, based on calculations by financial services provider Mercer.

Both Italian cities are getting comparatively more expensive, with Milan jumping 11 places in a year and Rome up from 44th place in 2013.

Based on the study, which compares the cost of over 200 goods and services, such as housing and transport, life is more expensive in each of the two Italian cities than Vienna, Stockholm and Helsinki.

For The Local's British Stockholm-based Assistant Editor, Sophie Inge, who has also worked in Rome, some aspects of life in Sweden are much more expensive.

“Generally, eating out regularly in Rome is not likely to break the bank (as long as you avoid the tourist traps) whereas in Stockholm you could only really afford it about twice a month on an average salary,” she said.

“Alcohol is also extremely expensive, with a glass of wine costing up to 120 kronor (€13).”

Travel and accommodation were however on a par in the two European capitals, she said, although the set-up in Stockholm makes it easier for expats to rent cheaper homes.

“It’s only when you rent in the centre of Stockholm that you have to pay through the nose. But the public transport system here is so efficient that it’s perfectly feasible to live in the suburbs and commute to work,” Inge said.

Overall the most expensive cities for expats are in Africa – the top spot was taken by Luanda, the Angolan capital, followed by Chad’s capital N'Djamena.

In Europe three cities made it into the top ten, all in Switzerland. Zurich was ranked fifth, closely followed by sixth-place Geneva and the capital, Bern, coming in eighth place.

At the other end of the scale, the cheapest expat city in the world was named as Karachi, in Pakistan. 

SHOW COMMENTS