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Tourist tax: How much is it increasing in Italy's cities this year?

Giampietro Vianello
Giampietro Vianello - [email protected]
Tourist tax: How much is it increasing in Italy's cities this year?
Tourists stand in front of Rome's Pantheon monument in July 2023. Photo by Alberto PIZZOLI / AFP

From Milan to Florence to Rome, if you’re visiting (and staying in) one of Italy’s major cities, you’ll have to pay a local 'tourist tax' on top of your accommodation bill – but rates vary from place to place.

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First introduced in 2011, Italy’s tourist tax (or imposta di soggiorno) is a charge imposed by several town or city authorities around the country on visitors staying in accommodation overnight to help offset the costs of public services enjoyed by both residents and tourists (waste disposal, green areas maintenance, subsidised public transport, etc.).

The tax, which shouldn’t be mistaken for the entry fee currently being trialled in Venice, applies to all types of accommodation (hotels, B&Bs, holiday rentals, hostels, campsites) and is paid directly to the accommodation owner or provider. 

Besides long-standing debates over its fairness, the charge is a frequent source of confusion for both national and international tourists as not all local authorities choose to apply it – around 1,000 municipalities had it in place last year – and rates tend to vary by city, type and star rating of accommodation, and even time of year. 

It’s not rare for local authorities (comuni) to raise their rates before the start of peak holiday season: the cities of Padua (Veneto) and Brescia (Lombardy) have both recently announced that they’ll increase the local tourist tax from July 1st 2024.

Though there’s no full list of comuni charging the tax in 2024, all of Italy’s most popular city destinations have it in place.

Rome

Rome is the most visited Italian city every year, which is why it may come as little surprise that the capital has some of the highest tourist tax rates in the country. 

The charge for hotel stays ranges from €4 to €10 a night per guest depending on the star rating, whereas a flat rate of €6 applies to B&Bs and short holiday rentals. The tax only applies to the first 10 days of your stay and guests aged under 10 are exempt.

READ ALSO: What is Italy’s city tax for tourists and where do you need to pay it?

For example, a couple spending seven nights in a five-star hotel (€10 rate) will have €140 – (10 x 2) x 7 – added to their accommodation bill.

Rates for all types of accommodation in Rome can be found here.

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Venice

Venice has arguably one of the most complex tourist tax systems in the country as rates vary not just by type and rating of the chosen accommodation, but also by location (city centre, smaller islands or mainland) and time of year. 

The charge for hotel stays in the city centre in peak tourist season (from the beginning of February until the end December) ranges from €1 to €5 per guest per night, whereas it goes from a minimum of €2 to a maximum of €5 for B&Bs. 

Children under 10 are exempt and the tax only applies to the first five days of your stay. Further details are available here.

Tourists paying the city’s tourist tax (imposta di soggiorno) are exempt from paying the new entry fee, which only applies to day-trippers (or turisti giornalieri).

Florence 

Tuscany’s capital raised its tourist tax rates in April 2023, with hikes as high as 60 percent in some cases.

Tourists walk in front of Florence's Palazzo Vecchio

Tourists walk in front of Florence's Palazzo Vecchio in June 2022. Photo by Vincenzo PINTO / AFP

Under the current system, the charge ranges from €3.50 to €8 per guest for hotel stays, with a flat €5.50 rate for non-hotel establishments (including Airbnb stays).

READ ALSO: What’s the difference between Italy’s city taxes and new ‘tourist tax’?

Children under 12 are exempt and the tax applies to a maximum of seven days.

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Milan

The charge for hotel stays in Lombardy’s capital ranges from €2.50 to €5 per guest depending on the accommodation’s star rating, whereas a flat €4.50 rate applies to B&Bs, short rentals and holiday houses.

Guests under 18 are exempt from the tax.

Naples

Like Florence, Naples also raised its rates last year. 

Under current rules, the tax goes from €2 to €5 for hotel stays, with a fixed €3 rate for non-hotel accommodation establishments.

The charge doesn’t apply to guests under the age of 14.

Turin 

In Piedmont’s capital the charge ranges from €2.30 to €5 for hotel stays, whereas there’s a €2.30 flat rate for non-hotel establishments. 

A €1 fee applies to guests in campsites and hostels.

Children under 12 are exempt in all cases and the tax applies to a maximum of seven days.

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Bologna

Unlike most other major cities around Italy, Bologna’s charge on hotel stays doesn’t vary by type and rating of the chosen accommodation but rather by price range per night:

  • Up to €30.99 per night: €3 charge
  • Up to €70.99: €4.2 charge
  • Up to €120.99: €4.6
  • €121 or over: €5

A view of Bologna's central Piazza Maggiore square

A view of Bologna's central Piazza Maggiore square. Photo by GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP

The city charges guests in campsites and hostels a €2 flat rate per night, while holiday rentals are taxed at 7.5 percent of the daily accommodation price for a maximum of €5 per night.

The tax applies to the first seven days of your stay and children under 14 are exempt.

Verona

The charge for hotel stays in Verona goes from a minimum of €1.50 to €5, whereas a €2 to €5 rate applies to B&Bs and holiday rentals.

The tax applies to the first four days of your stay and children under 15 are exempt. Further details can be found here.

Smaller cities and resorts

There’s no full list of Italian comuni charging the tourist tax, meaning it’s often hard for both national and international visitors to find out beforehand whether or not the place they’re planning on staying in applies the fee. 

This is especially true for less popular tourist destinations around the country, for which there may be very little information readily available online.

If you’re unsure on whether or not the city, town or resort you’re planning on staying in charges the tax, it’s advisable to look for an imposta di soggiorno item in the tributi (taxes) section of the local town hall website – or alternatively run a Google search of this sort: comune di [town] + imposta di soggiorno + relevant year.

Should neither of the above options work, you can also get in touch with one of the local accommodation establishments and directly ask about the charge.

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Comments (1)

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Kris 2024/06/13 03:31
If you are using a cities facilities no-one should complain about the tourist tax. We have recently come back from Italy and in Padua the place we stayed in for four nights didn't charge a tourist tax because it was only €1 per night, which is ridiculous, it should be way higher, so glad to see it is being raised there. We as tourists use the locals facilities so should pay for them, it shouldn't be up to locals to foot the bill for everything.

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