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Date set for Berlusconi politics ban debate

AFP/The Local · 9 Sep 2013, 17:01

Published: 09 Sep 2013 17:01 GMT+02:00

The announcement follows a landmark supreme court ruling on August 1st that turned down Berlusconi's final appeal against a tax fraud conviction and upheld a 12-month sentence. A hearing next month will decide whether he should be committed to house arrest or community service, while an appeals court will rule on whether the former prime minister should be banned from holding public office for one to three years.

Berlusconi's legal woes were also discussed by Italian lawmakers on Monday, as politicians began hearings to decide whether he should be expelled from parliament following his criminal conviction in an unprecedented case that has stoked political tensions.

Berlusconi's defiance over the possible sanction is unique in Europe's recent political history and threatens the coalition between his People of Freedom (PdL) and the centre-left Democratic Party (PD).

As the eurozone's third biggest economy struggles to exit a recession that has led to record unemployment, the 76-year-old former prime minister and billionaire tycoon has once again taken the political centre stage.

A Senate committee began its meeting to discuss his ejection, even though stalling tactics from Berlusconi's supporters could drag the process on for months before a compulsory final Senate vote.

The meeting began with a lengthy statement in Berlusconi's defence by PdL senator Andrea Augello.

Berlusconi has complained that a new law against criminals in parliament adopted last year with the aim of cleaning up Italian politics and approved with votes from his own party in fact violates his rights.

The three-time premier has appealed to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, arguing that the law should not apply for convictions relating to crimes committed before its adoption, as in his case.

The law would also prevent Berlusconi from taking part in the next general election set for 2018.

The PD's leadership has said it will vote to apply the law but the PdL argues that Berlusconi should receive "political freedom of movement" since he leads a party for which millions of Italians have voted.

Some of Berlusconi's critics have pleaded with him to resign voluntarily and spare Italy more embarrassment.

PD leader Guglielmo Epifani has warned that Italy risks looking like a "banana republic" internationally.

Nichi Vendola, leader of the leftist SEL party, said the case is "unique for a Western democracy".

Berlusconi could lead his party from outside parliament but expulsion would be a blow as he has been a lawmaker ever since entering politics in 1994.

Story continues below…

Most experts agree that Berlusconi's supporters are unlikely to bring down the government, even though they have repeatedly threatened to do so if their leader is expelled from parliament.

Prime Minister Enrico Letta warned on Sunday that political instability "carries a cost" but said he did not believe the PdL would abandon the coalition.

Financial markets have held up relatively well and the FTSE Mib stock market index was up 0.55 percent during trading on Monday, while borrowing costs fell in an indication of improved investor confidence.

But tensions are still bound to rise as Berlusconi has shown no sign of backing down even though some of his aides have advocated a more humble approach that could earn him a pardon from the Italian presidency.

The government was forged between the rival PD and PdL parties after a two-month deadlock following a general election in February that failed to give any party a ruling majority in parliament.

AFP/The Local (news@thelocal.it)

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