Italy calls anti-terror meeting after Nice attack

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Italy is tightening security following the attacks in Nice. Photo: AFP
08:24 CEST+02:00
Italy's Interior Minister Angelino Alfano called an emergency meeting of the national anti-terrorism committee on Friday morning in the wake of Thursday night's terror attack in the southern French city of Nice.

The meeting will begin at 9am, Alfano announced on Twitter.

Eighty-four people, including many children, were killed when a lorry drove through the crowds of people celebrating Bastile Day.

Alfano also said Italy will be stepping up its controls at the French border following the attack.

Italy's Foreign Ministry said the country's crisis unit had been activated and that the Italian consulate and embassy in Paris were working with local authorities to establish if any Italian nationals were among the victims.

The Vatican said in a statement that it "condemned in the strongest possible terms" the bloodshed in Nice.

Just yesterday, Alfano announced the country had 'intensified security' due to a “resurgence of jihadist threats”.

He said the country’s security alert level remained at 2, the highest possible in the absence of a direct attack, while there will also be targeted checks at smaller airports, prisons, ports, railways and on buses.

Alfano told a meeting of the national security and public order committee that the country “must maintain a high level of alert and strengthen security measures across the entire national territory, especially at vulnerable targets”.

Italy increased its security level in the wake of the terrorist attacks in Paris on November 13th, in which 130 people were killed.

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The minister has also signed deportation orders for 99 people suspected of being connected to terrorism since January 1st.

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