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COVID-19 RULES

LATEST: Italy scraps all Covid entry rules for travellers

Italy will lift the requirement for arrivals to show proof of testing, recovery or vaccination from Wednesday, the health ministry has confirmed.

LATEST: Italy scraps all Covid entry rules for travellers
Travel to Italy will now be restriction-free for the first time since March 2020. Photo by Tiziana FABI / AFP

Italy’s health ministry said on Monday night that the current requirement to show proof of coronavirus vaccination, recent recovery or a negative test result in order to enter Italy “will not be extended” when it expires on May 31st.

This is the last remaining Covid-related rule in place for travellers to Italy, after the requirement for arrivals to complete an EU digital passenger locator form (dPLF) was lifted on May 1st.

READ ALSO: Will Italy scrap the last Covid restrictions on June 15th?

The health minister is also expected to make a decision soon on whether Italy’s public transport mask mandate will be lifted on June 15th – as planned in the latest government decree – or extended beyond this date.

Under these rules, airports and airlines may choose to continue requiring passengers flying to or from Italy to wear masks until that date, despite the EU-wide mask mandate on flights being lifted in mid-May.

 
Find more information about Italy’s Covid-19 health restrictions on the Italian health ministry’s website (available in English).

Member comments

  1. Mind you, in late April the immigration official in Rome waved us past when we tried to show our certificates!

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TRAVEL NEWS

EU delays passport scan system and €7 travel fee until 2023

Two major changes that were due to come into force in 2022 for travellers entering the EU - an enhanced passport scanning system and the introduction of a €7 visa for tourists - have been delayed for a year.

EU delays passport scan system and €7 travel fee until 2023

Although both the EES and ETIAS schemes are still due to be introduced in the European Commission has pushed back the start dates for both until 2023.

It comes amid a chaotic summer for travel in Europe, with airports struggling with staff shortages and strikes while some crossings from the UK to France have been hit by long delays as extra post-Brexit checks are performed during the peak holiday season. 

The two separate changes to travel in the EU and Schengen zone were originally due to come into effect in 2020, but were delayed because of the pandemic. Now the EES system is expected to come into effect in May 2023, while ETIAS will come into effect in November 2023. 

The EES – Entry and Exit System – is essentially enhanced passport scanning at the EU’s borders and means passports will not only be checked for ID and security, but also for entry and exit dates, in effect tightening up enforcement of the ’90 day rule’ that limits the amount of time non-EU citizens can spend in the Bloc without having a visa.

It will not affect non-EU citizens who live in an EU country with a residency permit or visa.

There have been concerns that the longer checks will make transiting the EU’s external borders slower, a particular problem at the UK port of Dover, where the infrastructure is already struggling to cope with enhanced post-Brexit checks of people travelling to France.

You can read a full explanation of EES, what it is and who is affects HERE.

The ETIAS system will apply to all non-EU visitors to an EU country – eg tourists, second-home owners, those making family visits and people doing short-term work.

It will involve visitors registering in advance for a visa and paying a €7 fee. The visa will be valid for three years and can be used for multiple trips – essentially the system is very similar to the ESTA visa required for visitors to the USA. 

Residents of an EU country who have a residency card or visa will not need one.

You can read the full details on ETIAS, how it works and who it affects HERE.

Both systems will apply only to people who do not have citizenship of an EU country – for example Brits, Americans, Australians and Canadians – and will be used only at external EU/Schengen borders, so it won’t be required when travelling between France and Germany, for example. 

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