Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland
Advertisement

Mayor calls in ghostbusters to investigate small Italian town

Share this article

Mayor calls in ghostbusters to investigate small Italian town
File photo: Pexels
12:30 CET+01:00
A small town in Cremona, northern Italy, has called in a team of ghostbusters to suss out any spooky goings-on in the town's public buildings.

Of particular interest to the Italian Society of Paranormal Research, also known as Silent, was Ostiano's local theatre, which is housed in a 16th century-castle.

The ghost-hunters also spent time looking at the cellars of the local library, filming both locations with special cameras at nighttime.

The results have not yet been analysed, so it's too soon to say if the town of 3,000 (living) souls is also home to any supernatural beings. 

But the search for ghouls has already ruffled a few feathers, with 45-year-old history teacher Carlo De Carli telling local paper La Provincia di Cremona: "There is no scientific proof, and I'm scandalized that in 2016 an administration wastes time with such nonsense."

But mayor Lorenzo Locatelli insisted that giving the group free access to public buildings was justified. "They are not looking for ghosts, but for energy bubbles and electrical currents which are beyond the everyday," he said. "They're all amateurs, but very serious people who will give scientific explanations.

"Some of them are engineers and technicians who do this research as a hobby. It's their dream to find a 'presence', but in 20 hours of research they haven't found anything."

Back in 2013, an Abruzzo mayor called in the ghost-hunting squad to tackle strange goings-on in his neighbourhood, including werewolf sightings and a church built on the site of an old pagan temple.

 

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

Advertisement

From our sponsors

Eight hacks to turn your next long-haul flight into a holiday

While there's a lot of wisdom to the saying ‘it's the journey, not the destination', it's a safe assumption that most people don't view the flight itself as the highlight. Which is not to say it shouldn't be.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement