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'Don't dress up as a Roman': Rome to punish tourists for messy eating and bad manners at historic sites

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'Don't dress up as a Roman': Rome to punish tourists for messy eating and bad manners at historic sites
Men dressed as centurions near the Vatican. Photo: AFP
10:22 CEST+02:00
Authorities in Rome have introduced a new set of rules aimed at curbing the bad behaviour of tourists in the Italian capital.

The rules, which were implemented recently in Rome, aim to cut down on antisocial behaviour and disrespectful treatment of the city's cultural history and monuments.

Updated from legislation originally written in 1946, the measures include a ban on messy eating near monuments and singing on public transport, as well as against making money by posing for photos dressed as centurions in tunics and leather breastplates.

The rules also include bans on wheeled suitcases and buggies being dragged down historic staircases.

Walking around bare-chested, pub crawls and “nuisance drunks” are also targeted by the rules, while people who wrap their mouths around the nozzles of the city's drinking fountains could also find themselves censured.

Illegal street trading and ticket touting outside tourist attractions have also been banned, while locals will no longer be allowed to hang their laundry out to dry between neighbouring buildings – a sight as common in the city as its ancient edifices.

The nature of the punishment for the offences – whether a rebuke from police or a fine – is currently unclear, but authorities have said “severe fines” will be given for people who bathe in the city's fountains, The Guardian writes.

“Old regulations have been updated to adapt to the needs of a modern society,” Marco Cardilli, deputy chief of staff and security delegate at Rome's council, told the newspaper.

Rome is not the first Italian destination to take action against unruly tourists.

Earlier this year, officials in Cinque Terre threatened to fine holidaymakers up to 2,500 euros for walking along its scenic trails in flip flops, sandals or other unsuitable footwear.

In Venice, visitors caught snacking, sunbathing or taking a dip in canals risk being kicked out of the city and banned from returning.

The city has also has also introduced a booking system to encourage visitors to reserve entry in advance, following on from its decision to begin charging tourists an entry fee in an effort to manage numbers.

Rome has already banned tourist buses from its historic centre.

READ ALSO: New calls for Venice to ban cruise ships after harbour crash

 

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