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IN PICTURES: How Italy is coping with the heatwave

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IN PICTURES: How Italy is coping with the heatwave
A pair of pups cool off in Rome. Photo: Tiziana Fabi/AFP
08:14 CEST+02:00
As the heatwave scorching Europe reaches its peak, here's what 40+ degrees C looks like in Italy.


Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP

An alarming reading on a pharmacy thermometer in Reggio Emilia, Emilia-Romagna. While the maximum temperature forecast was 41 degrees C, the 'real feel' in airless cities was higher. 


Photo: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP

Tourists visit Rome's Colosseum in the heat. The official advice is to stay out of the sun between 11am and 6pm.


Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP

Cooling off in central Milan. If you can't run shirtless through a fountain, the Italian health ministry recommends splashing your arms and face with cool water and placing a damp cloth on the back of your neck.


Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP

Sunbathing in Milan's Piazza Sempione. Don't forget the sun cream (and sunglasses, and hat, and preferably a parasol).


Photo: Tiziana Fabi/AFP

A monkey at Rome's zoo gets a treat of frozen cherries. The health ministry recommends eating four to five light meals a day while it's hot, and loading up on fruit and vegetables with a high water content.


Photo: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP

... Of course, you could always eat gelato instead, like these tourists in Rome.


Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP

Closed shutters in Reggio Emilia. The Italian health ministry advises keeping blinds and shutters closed throughout the day to block out the sun.


Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP

Refilling bottles in Milan. Make the most of Italy's plentiful public drinking fountains and glug down at least 2 litres a day.


Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP

Cycling through Reggio Emilia. You're advised to avoid physical exertion in the heat, even if you're in good shape. Aside from the risk of dehydration and heatstroke, the heat exacerbates air pollution, making it especially dangerous for people with respiratory problems and allergies.


Photo: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP

It might be tempting to immerse yourself in one of Italy's historic fountains, but don't forget that doing so can earn you a stiff fine. Stick to dipping in a hand.


Photo: Tiziana Fabi/AFP

A dog cools off in Rome. Remember to provide your furry pals with plentiful shade and water, and never leave them unattended in a hot car.

 
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