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HEALTH

Where to register for a Covid-19 vaccine in your region of Italy

As Italy opens up coronavirus vaccinations to the general public, here's where and how to book your jab.

Where to register for a Covid-19 vaccine in your region of Italy
Here's where to register for a coronavirus vaccination in Italy. Photo: Marco Bertorello/AFP

Who is eligible for a vaccine in Italy right now?

Having finished vaccinating most healthcare workers and people in nursing homes, Italy continues to expand its vaccine campaign to its next highest priority group: people aged 80 and over.

But because the Italian medicines agency has recommended using the AstraZeneca vaccine only on under-55s, millions of doses that began arriving in Italy in February have been offered to younger, healthier adults working in essential sectors.

While the timing varies from region to region, in most parts of the country over-80s are being invited to get their jab now. Some regions have also extended vaccinations to the clinically vulnerable, over-70s and key workers including teachers, police and firefighters. 

For the time being, no one outside one of these categories is yet eligible for a Covid-19 jab. Find out where you come on Italy’s vaccination priority list here.

How do I get a jab?

Even if you are in one of the priority groups currently being offered the vaccine, you still need to book your slot.

Vaccination is currently by registration only and you should not go to a vaccination centre without an appointment

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Most regional health services now allow eligible residents to register online or by phone. You can also make an appointment on someone else’s behalf.

Depending on your region, you may be able to register via your usual doctor or in a pharmacy too.

You will be asked to choose where to go for your shot when you book your appointment. You can find a list of vaccination centres at the bottom of this page.

Depending on your circumstances, you will be asked for your codice fiscale (tax code) and/or your tessera sanitaria (health card). For more information, check the official websites listed below.

Where to book your vaccination in each region of Italy

Remember that registration is only open to certain priority groups at a time, and the timetable varies by region.

Keep checking your regional health service’s website to find out when you can join the queue.

Abruzzo

Basilicata

Calabria

Campania

Emilia-Romagna

Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Lazio

Liguria

Lombardy

Marche

Molise

Piedmont

Puglia

Sardinia

Sicily

Autonomous province of Trento

Autonomous province of Bolzano

Tuscany

Umbria

Valle D’Aosta

Veneto

  • Regional vaccination information
  • Eligible residents will be contacted by their doctor or local health authority
  • Online registration due to become available from March 30th

The Local cannot advise on individual cases. For specific advice, please contact your local health authority or a medical professional.

Member comments

  1. Why are any links provided not presented in English? English speakers are your clients, not Italians. Please translate everything.

  2. I’m a bit confused by the article’s use of the words “registration” and “register” … for a vaccine. Are you using these words interchangeably with the word “booking.” Or are there two separate stages … first you register, then you book an appointment when your “stage” comes up? As my Italian is still far from perfect, and my region has a “prenotazione” number , I like to know beforehand exactly what I am ringing for!
    Hope someone can help.
    Thanks

  3. as an italian citizen living abroad , i can not register on any of the sites for a vaccination while in italy

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TRAVEL NEWS

Covid face mask rule on flights in Europe set to be eased

The mandatory EU-wide mask requirement for air travel is set to be dropped from Monday, May 16th, but airlines may still require passengers to wear masks on some or all flights

Covid face mask rule on flights in Europe set to be eased

Europe-wide facemask rules on flights are set to be ditched as early as next week in light of new recommendations from health and air safety experts.

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) dropped recommendations for mandatory mask-wearing in airports and during flights in updated Covid-19 safety measures for travel issued on Wednesday, May 11th.

The new rules are expected to be rolled out from Monday, May 16th, but airlines may still continue to require the wearing of masks on some or all of flights. And the updated health safety measures still say that wearing a face mask remains one of the best ways to protect against the transmission of the virus.

The joint EASA/ECDC statement reminded travellers that masks may still be required on flights to destinations in certain countries that still require the wearing of masks on public transport and in transport hubs.

It also recommends that vulnerable passengers should continue to wear a face mask regardless of the rules, ideally an FFP2/N95/KN95 type mask which offers a higher level of protection than a standard surgical mask.

“From next week, face masks will no longer need to be mandatory in air travel in all cases, broadly aligning with the changing requirements of national authorities across Europe for public transport,” EASA executive director Patrick Ky said in the statement. 

“For passengers and air crews, this is a big step forward in the normalisation of air travel. Passengers should however behave responsibly and respect the choices of others around them. And a passenger who is coughing and sneezing should strongly consider wearing a face mask, for the reassurance of those seated nearby.”  

ECDC director Andrea Ammon added: “The development and continuous updates to the Aviation Health Safety Protocol in light of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic have given travellers and aviation personnel better knowledge of the risks of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and its variants. 

“While risks do remain, we have seen that non-pharmaceutical interventions and vaccines have allowed our lives to begin to return to normal. 

“While mandatory mask-wearing in all situations is no longer recommended, it is important to be mindful that together with physical distancing and good hand hygiene it is one of the best methods of reducing transmission. 

“The rules and requirements of departure and destination states should be respected and applied consistently, and travel operators should take care to inform passengers of any required measures in a timely manner.”

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