SHARE
COPY LINK

DRIVING

EXPLAINED: What is Italy’s ‘pink parking’ and how do you use it?

Are you pregnant or do you have a child under two years old? Here's how you can use Italy's priority pink parking, according to updated rules of the Highway Code.

EXPLAINED: What is Italy's 'pink parking' and how do you use it?
Italys pink parking permit allows pregnant women and parents with children under two years old to park in priority spots. Photo: Karli Drinkwater

Finding a car parking space can be a headache in Italy, especially in busy town centres at peak times.

To ease the burden on drivers with precious cargo, Italy recently formalised its rules on so-called ‘pink parking’ (parcheggio rosa) for pregnant women or parents with children under two years old.

READ ALSO: How visitors to Italy can avoid driving penalties

Pink lines on the road reserved for this group is nothing new, as it existed in some form before, but the latest Highway Code reform introduced new measures and formalised what was previously a gesture.

Here’s what the parking privilege entitles you to now and how to prove you’re eligible to use it.

How pink parking spaces have changed

Before the Italian authorities updated the Highway Code in November, individual towns could reserve some parking spaces, but only for certain categories of people, such as those with limited mobility.

These categories could include pregnant women, but this was not explicitly stated.

As it wasn’t a national measure, town halls created their own pink parking spaces near essential public services like hospitals, schools, parks, banks and post offices. Supermarkets have also historically created pink parking spaces for clients, as a gesture of courtesy.

(Photo by ANDREAS SOLARO / AFP)

Under the reform, however, the Highway Code provided for pink parking spaces formally, nationwide.

Italy’s road rules contained a reference to parking spots for pregnant women and parents with children up to the age of two. In order to use these parking spaces, you need a ‘pink permit’ (permesso rosa).

Article 158 of the Highway Code prohibits parking within pink lines if you don’t fall into this category.

Anyone caught using a pink parking space who is not eligible could be fined from anywhere between €80 to €328 for mopeds and from €165 to €660 for other vehicles.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: How do you dispute a parking ticket in Italy?

How do you get a pink permit?

To apply for a pink permit, you need to apply to your town hall as the permit must be issued by the municipality of residence (comune di residenza).

Each local authority should have a form for you to fill out, which will then be reviewed by the police.

Depending on where you live, however, it’s worth noting that not all town halls have caught up with the new regulations and may not yet be in a position to give you a pink permit.

The Local contacted one municipality in the province of Bologna to apply, to which they replied, “The municipality is still in the process of identifying any areas to be dedicated to ‘pink’ parking.

“We very much doubt that this will happen before the end of summer 2022.”

To find out if your town hall has begun issuing permits, you can usually email or go online with Spid authentication, if available.

In order to obtain the pink permit you will normally need to show:

  • A copy of the certificate of the baby’s due date of birth or the birth certificate;
  • A copy of your driving licence;
  • A copy of your car registration document.

See full details of Italy’s Highway Code here and visit our travel section for the latest updates.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.
For members

READER QUESTIONS

Reader question: Can I buy a car in Italy if I’m not a resident?

If you spend extended periods of time in Italy, can you buy a car to use while in the country? It all depends on your residency status.

Reader question: Can I buy a car in Italy if I'm not a resident?

Question: ‘We own a second home in Italy and we’d like to purchase a car to use there during our visits. But we’re not registered as residents. Are we allowed to buy a car in Italy?’

It’s a common question from people who spend extended periods of time in Italy but are, for one reason or another, not registered as Italian residents.

The short answer is: if you’re a legal resident in Italy, then you can buy a car in Italy.

As a general rule, if you don’t have residency in Italy – even if you own property in Italy or have business interests in the country – you are not legally allowed to buy a car in Italy.

READ ALSO: Can second-home owners get an Italian residence permit?

According to the Italian highway code, you need to have registered your residency with an Italian municipality to be able to buy a new or used vehicle in Italy.

While you might find a friendly neighbour willing to sell you their old motor regardless, you would also need to register the change of ownership with the Motor Vehicles Office (Ufficio Motorizzazione Civile) and the Public Vehicle Registry (Pubblico Registro Automobilistico or PRA).

This is where you’d run into trouble without the right paperwork, which includes a residence permit (permesso di soggiorno), or if you’re an EU citizen, your proof of residence (certificato di residenza). You’ll also need your Italian tax code (codice fiscale) and other documents, some of which you may not be able to obtain without residency.

So could you instead bring your own car to Italy from abroad? For short periods, there’s no issue with doing this – assuming that you’re willing and able to drive between Italy and your home country.

READ ALSO: Q&A: Your questions answered about driving in Italy on a British licence

But for the longer term, importing a car to Italy and registering it here would again require you to be able to show proof of Italian residency.

If you live between two or more countries, there’s a lot to consider when deciding whether you should – or could – register as a resident in Italy.

Doing so is more than a simple declaration of your presence in Italy; being registered as a resident means you’ll face certain requirements (most notably those related to paying taxes) as well as rights in the country. Read more about the process of obtaining Italian residency here.

So if registering as a resident is not an option in your circumstances, you may have to stick with the rental car for now or explore the longer-term alternatives to hiring a car in Italy.

Please note that many bureaucratic processes and requirements often vary from one part of Italy to another. This article is not intended to be a comprehensive guide to purchasing or registering a car in Italy.

For further information and advice please contact your local Motorizzazione Civile office or consult the Automobile Club d’Italia.

See more in The Local’s Driving in Italy section.

SHOW COMMENTS