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Where in Italy are house prices rising fastest?

Property values are expected to continue rising overall in Italy in 2023, but the situation looks much better in some cities than others. Here's how average prices compare.

Where in Italy are house prices rising fastest?
The northern port city of Genoa. House prices are rising much more quickly in some parts of Italy than others. Photo by Belinda Fewings on Unsplash

Until 2020 Italy’s real estate market had long suffered stagnation, weighed down by a large number of old, neglected properties which were proving difficult to sell.

But the pandemic turned Italy’s property market on its head, leading to the first increase in house prices for years at the end of the first quarter of 2020.

This trend has held up since, and industry experts cautiously predict further price growth in 2023 – albeit more modest than previously hoped.

Factors putting the brakes on growth include the soaring cost of living eroding households’ purchasing power, rising mortgage interest rates, the soaring cost of building materials, and a shrinking economy.

REVEALED: Where in Europe have house prices and rent costs increased the most?

Mortgages are also expected to become more difficult to obtain in 2023, meaning fewer people able to make a purchase.

But despite the gloomy picture overall, the outlook varies significantly around the country and some cities are expected to see a significant rise in prices this year.

Milan remains by far the most expensive major Italian city for a property purchase, but prices are rising faster elsewhere. Photo by Ron Dylewski on Unsplash

A recent report from Idealista Insights, the property search portal’s research team, looked at changes in the average prices per square metre in property listings in Italy’s biggest cities.

In 2022, the price per square metre “generally increased throughout the country, with ‘exclusive’ neighbourhoods becoming even more inaccessible to the average buyer,” the report found.

But, while bigger northern cities saw rising prices across the board, most southern cities were struggling with “stagnation”, it said.

Based on Idealista’s data, here are the ten most expensive cities to buy property in Italy, in order of the rate at which prices are rising.

  1. Genoa: the Ligurian capital is Italy’s tenth-most expensive city to live in – but prices here are rising faster than anywhere else on average, according to Idealista. An increase of 4.5 percent is forecast for Genoa in 2023, meaning the price per square metre will go from 1,602 to 1,674 euros.
  2. Bologna: Bologna records the second-highest price increase in Italy compared to 2022. The citywide average price per square metre will rise by an estimated 3.9 percent, reaching 3,419 euros.
  3. Verona: in seventh place we find the city of Romeo and Juliet, where the increase in prices is substantial, equal to 3.2 percent. The average cost will rise by around 80 euros per square metre, going from 2,483 to 2,563 euros per square metre.
  4. Milan: Italy’s economic capital will easily remain the most expensive city for property purchases, with prices set to rise by 2.9 percent compared to 2022. The average price per square metre is expected to exceed 5,300 euros, 150 more than now, with significant price variation between city districts.
  5. Bari: The capital of Puglia in the south-east is set to record an price increase of 2.8 percent, with the citywide average price per square metre going from 1,909 euros to 1,962 – making it the ninth most expensive Italian city in which to buy property and the only southern city to record a significant increase. 
  6. Turin: The northwestern city can expect an overall price increase of 1.5 percent, equal to around 30 euros more per square metre for a final price of 1,979 euros on average. 
  7. Florence: The Tuscan capital still has the second-highest prices, and can expect an average price increase of 1.4 percent, with the cost per square metre to rise from 4,128 to 4,184 euros .
  8. Rome: The capital may have some highly sought-after and expensive districts, but overall average prices will remain at around 3,336 euros, up slightly from 3,360 in 2022. This is equal to an increase of just 0.76 percent.
  9. Venice: La Serenissima remains the fifth-most expensive city to buy property again this year as the average price will remain almost unchanged with a reduction of -0.3 percent, meaning the cost per square metre will be around 3,090 euros.
  10. Naples: The southern capital is set to go against the trend, with a -1.5 percent drop in house prices expected. This means the average price per square metre will go from 2,737 to 2,696 euros, a difference of 41 euros.

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POLITICS

Italy’s Meloni slams eurozone fund ahead of parliamentary debate

Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni slammed the eurozone's rescue fund as "not very useful" on Thursday, ahead of a parliamentary debate on whether to strengthen its role.

Italy's Meloni slams eurozone fund ahead of parliamentary debate

The European Stability Mechanism (ESM) was created in 2012 to allow eurozone states in financial distress access to markets and facilitate loans at subsidised rates.

In return, countries must implement reforms to improve their competitiveness and clean up their public finances.

The mechanism is deeply distrusted in Italy, where it is seen as an instrument of austerity imposed by northern Europe on southern countries.

“The question I would like to ask, before entering the debate that will take place in Parliament on whether or not to ratify something that is not very useful, is: can we make this tool useful?” Meloni told local television.

READ ALSO: Italian PM Meloni refuses to back down on reporter ‘defamation’ trial

“As long as I count for something, I can sign in blood that Italy will not call on the ESM,” she said.

At the beginning of 2021, eurozone member states signed a treaty strengthening the role of the fund, paving the way for its ratification by national parliaments before it comes into force.

Italy is the only country in the 19-country eurozone that has not ratified the reform.

The use of the mechanism comes with strict reform conditions, similar to those imposed on Greece during its bailout in 2015, when the then-left government lost access to financial markets.

“Why has the ESM never been used by anyone? Because the conditions are too strict and because the ESM is a privileged creditor, meaning that if it gets into trouble, it is the first to be repaid,” Meloni said.

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